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Definition

3Gb/s SAS Definition

Thumbnail image for SAS.cmyk.jpgThe first generation, 3Gb/s SAS, replaces parallel SCSI which could no longer keep pace with industry performance and scalability demands. SAS fulfilled the storage industry's need for faster systems with more advanced capabilities. SAS features which support faster performance include dual-port drives and wide ports, enabling full-duplex data transmission plus aggregated bandwidth. Universal connectivity is an added SAS advantage.

Press Releases

Recent SAS Plugfest Featured Large-System Build with 3Gb/s SAS

San Francisco, July 28, 2008 — The SCSI Trade Association (STA), a member-run industry association established to support and promote SCSI technology, announced today that the eighth Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) plugfest was held June 16-19, 2008, at the University of New Hampshire InterOperability Laboratory (UNH-IOL). The plugfest was attended by both STA member and non-member companies. See below for a list of the twenty attending STA members.

July 23-27 SAS Plugfest Featured SAS and SATA HDDs, Enclosures and Cabling Product Testing

San Francisco, August 20, 2007 - The SCSI Trade Association (STA), a member-run industry association established to support and promote SCSI technology, announced today that the seventh Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) plugfest was held July 23-27, 2007, at the University of New Hampshire InterOperability Laboratory (UNH-IOL). The plugfest was attended by both STA member and non-member companies. See page two for a list of the attending STA members.

Tests made available to attendees Included:

  • Single zoning
  • Multiple zones
  • Interoperability of Serial ATA (SATA) drives in a SAS environment

STA Proclaims SAS HDD Usage Rate is a Leading Indicator of Explosive Future Demand

SAN FRANCISCO, June 25, 2007 — The SCSI Trade Association (STA), a member-run industry association established to support and promote SCSI technology, announced that 3Gb/s Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) will replace Ultra320 SCSI as the hard disk drive (HDD) interface of choice in standard high volume servers during 2007. A recent Gartner research report, Dataquest Alert: Serial Attached SCSI to Dominate in 2007, by John Monroe, Research VP, Gartner Dataquest, covers the multi-user SAS HDD market, citing 4.15 million, or 11.2 percent, of all multi-user HDDs utilized in 2006 were SAS drives. When combined with 2005 SAS HDD shipments (the first year SAS HDDs shipped in any significant volume, according to Gartner), the installed base of SAS HDDs at the end of 2006 totaled nearly 4.5 million units. The Report predicts that almost 12 million SAS HDDs will ship this year.

STA Sees Strong SAS Market Ahead

San Francisco, November 13, 2006 — The SCSI Trade Association (STA), a member-run industry association, established to support and to promote SCSI technology, sees the Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) market achieving the level promised two years ago. To date, about half of STA member companies have introduced in excess of 75 SAS products to the market, providing all of the components and sub-systems, as well as the features and speeds required by system integrators and OEMs to build SAS-based storage systems.

April 24-28 Plugfest Features Largest Fabric Build to Date

San Francisco, May 22, 2006 - SCSI Trade Association (STA), a member-run industry association established to support and promote SCSI technology, and the University of New Hampshire InterOperability Laboratory (UNH-IOL), announced today that the sixth Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) plugfest was held April 24-28. The tests emphasized large system builds and the performance of fabrics during attempts to disrupt the data flow. Fifteen STA members attended the plugfest (see page two for a list of the attending members).

The highlight of the plugfest was the array of large system builds (of which there were several), configured as the largest, most complex fabric to date. The system builds contained many servers, enclosures, HBAs, expanders, analyzers, hard disk drives, tape drives, and an active multiplexer (MUX), provided by the attending vendors. All of the large builds were stable configurations and were successfully tested by hot-plugging and swapping drives. These tests verified that broadcast change notifications did not disrupt the fabric which would cause the system to stop transferring data.

Large "System Builds" include More than 110 Drives

San Francisco, May 10, 2005 — The SCSI Trade Association (STA), a member-run industry association established to support and promote SCSI technology, announced today that the first Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) plugfest of 2005, held April 25-29 at the UNH-IOL test lab, exceeded all expectations. For the 18 attending STA member companies, the interoperability results were very favorable for vendors planning to introduce their system products in the next few months (see page two for a list of attending STA members).

November 1-5 Plugfest Brings SAS Manufacturers Together to Assure Delivery of Interoperable SAS Products in 2005

SAN FRANCISCO and DURHAM, NH -- Dec. 6, 2004 — The largest-ever multi-company SAS plugfest to date brought more than 100 engineers together to fine-tune their company's storage products and to foster interoperability between Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) storage devices, the University of New Hampshire InterOperability Laboratory (UNH-IOL) and the SCSI Trade Association (STA) announced today.

SAS is the rapidly-advancing, high-speed alternative to SCSI technology being used today. It represents a reincarnation of the long-established SCSI protocol in a powerful form designed to meet the ever-growing performance requirements of enterprise data centers.

Third Serial Attached SCSI Plugfest Tests Products For Market In 4th Quarter and Early 2005

SAN FRANCISCO and DURHAM, NH - Oct. 19, 2004 - The SCSI Trade Association (STA), a member-run industry consortium established to support and promote SCSI technology and the University of New Hampshire InterOperability Laboratory (UNH-IOL) announced today that the third Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) plugfest of the year will be held from November 1-5 at UNH-IOL. The UNH-IOL laboratory is hosting the event in its 32,000 square foot Durham facility. An open invitation to attend is extended to any company interested in advancing SAS technology and bringing SAS products to market.

SAS Demonstrations Highlight Dual-port SAS Drive Reliability/Scalability and SAS/SATA Drives in a SAS System Showing Performance/Flexibility

San Francisco, Sept. 7, 2004 - The SCSI Trade Association (STA), a member-run industry consortium established to support and promote SCSI technology, announced today that it is showing two live SAS demonstrations in the STA booth (booth number 939, Moscone Convention Center), at the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) in San Francisco, September 7-9.

Special Two-day SAS/SATA Interoperability Session Fulfills Purpose

SAN FRANCISCO, July 19, 2004 — The SCSI Trade Association (STA), a member-run industry consortium established to support and promote SCSI technology, announced that the second Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) plugfest, held June 21-25 at UNH-IOL, achieved major milestones in advancing the interoperability of SAS products. A special session on June 23-24 tested the interoperability of Serial ATA (SATA) products operating within SAS component infrastructures.

Sixteen Companies Test Their Products for Interoperability

San Francisco and Durham, N. H., March 17, 2004 — The UNH InterOperability Laboratory (UNH-IOL) and the SCSI Trade Association (STA), a member-run industry association established to support and promote SCSI technology, concluded the industry's first full-scale Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) interoperability plugfest. The test event, held March 1-5, included many of the industry's leading disk drive, controller, test equipment, cable, connector and system suppliers. Engineers tested SAS components and systems for multi-vendor interoperability.

Participating companies included Adaptec, Inc., Amphenol, Catalyst Enterprises, CATC, Data Transit, Dell Corp., Expert Analytical Systems, Fujitsu, HP, Hitachi GST, I-Tech Corp., LSI Logic Corp., Maxtor Corp., Molex, PMC-Sierra and Seagate Technology.

Sign up For STA's New Free "Serial Storage Wire" e-Newsletter at the STA Booth, # 647

San Francisco, February 16, 2004 — The SCSI Trade Association (STA) will be exhibiting at the Intel Developer Forum (IDF), an industry opportunity for technology and computing firms to exchange information and ideas. The conference will take place in San Francisco's Moscone West Convention Center from February 17-19, 2004. In addition to exhibiting in booth # 647, STA is presenting a double session class and Harry Mason, President of the STA Board of Directors, will participate on the IDF storage panel from 6:30 to 8pm, Tuesday evening, February 17, at the Argent Hotel. STA will also participate in a SAS "Birds of a Feather" session on Thursday, February 19, from noon to 12:45pm at the Argent Hotel, Cornell Room.

Standardization Supports Product Deployment in 2004

San Francisco and Washington DC, January 28, 2004 — The SCSI Trade Association (STA) and the InterNational Committee for Information Technology Standards (INCITS) announced today that the Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) standard has been approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The SAS standard is designated as ANSI/INCITS 376-2003 and can be purchased through the INCITS website at http://www.INCITS.org.

T10 Committee Forwards Specification to INCITS

San Francisco, May 20, 2003 — The SCSI Trade Association (STA), a member-run industry consortium established to support and promote SCSI technology, announced today that the Serial Attached SCSI 1.0 specification was forwarded on May 8 by the T10 Committee to the InterNational Committee for Information Technology Standards (INCITS). The specification will be circulated by INCITS for public review and comment followed by a letter ballot, both key milestones on the path to becoming an international standard.

Articles

Making the Move from FC to SAS

If you're a regular reader of STA's Serial Storage Wire, you know that there's a transition taking place in the storage industry from FC-AL to Serial-Attached SCSI (SAS) storage architectures and disk drives... NetApp is well into this technology transition, where SAS-connected disk shelves now account for a majority of storage shipped with new NetApp® systems.

Download full article.

Contributed article that appeared in January 2007 issue of Storage Solutions Resource Catalog
by: Susan Bobholz, Intel

The first generation of SAS (Serial Attached SCSI) products represents a major leap forward in storage technology. SAS drives have a full-duplex throughput of 3.0 Gb/s and are capable of providing a competitive advantage to enterprises that require fast access to data. While today's servers also have 3.0 Gb/s bandwidth, servers soon will be capable of communicating with storage at 6.0 Gb/s. The availability of 6.0 Gb/s SAS devices is expected to lag behind that of 6.0 Gb/s servers.

Read article...

Contributed article that appeared in January 2007 issue of SNS-Europe
by: Sam Barnett, Vitesse

Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) offers a wealth of benefits to the enterprise server and enclosure customer (high reliability and performance, mixed enterprise/desktop drive support, improved economies of scale) and key to scalability and performance is the expander. This article offers a technical exploration of SAS expander technology and its usage in building tiered-storage systems for midrange and enterprise users of tomorrow.

Read article...

Solving Command Time-out Issues

Contributed article that appeared in January 2007 issue of Storage Solutions Resource Catalog
by: Mike Micheletti, LeCroy

Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) is a storage interface developed to meet the needs of enterprise-class storage applications. Central to the SAS value proposition is the ability to scale storage systems beyond the limits of today's parallel SCSI, using a switching technology called Expanders. Designed to provide fan-out architecture for SAS, expanders allow SAS initiators to connect up to 16,000 physical devices in a single domain.

Read article...

Contributed article that appeared in October 2006 issue of SNS-Europe
by: Paul Vogt, Adaptec

In the past year, Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) has evolved from the conceptual next generation of SCSI to products that offer increased performance and flexibility in the real world. The ubiquitous availability of SAS offers new freedom to use a single storage platform to meets a wide range of performance, capability, capacity, and price requirements.

Read article...

Silent Revolution in the Storage Market

Contributed article that appeared in September 2006 issue of SNS-Europe
by: LSI Logic

Flexibility with SAS, SATA and Fibre Channel The storage market is currently undergoing a fundamental change: Two technologies, parallel SCSI and ATA, are being replaced by serial successors. But there's no need to rush; compatibility and market factors will ensure a peaceful coexistence is maintained for a long time yet.

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Contributed article that appeared in December 2002 issue of Computer Technology Review
by: Harry Mason, LSI Logic

The move to serially connected storage devices, primarily disk drives, is irrefutable. While today's installed base is relatively small and consists of a few million Fibre Channel drives, new interfaces that service a greater percentage of the storage market promises to change all of that. The number of serially connected storage devices deployed over the next four years could be well in excess of 100million drives!

VLSI integration and the advances of high-speed serial transceiver technology are rapidly driving the industry toward these versatile connection schemes. The advantages of these serial connections are many: smaller form factors, more flexible and thinner cabling, less weight, more predictable/reliable signaling mechanisms, and topologies that promise to scale with the needs of the end-users.

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Serial Schemes Eyed for Disk Storage

Contributed article written for the October 28, 2002 issue of Electronic Engineering Times
by: Marty Czekalski, Maxtor

The current state of the industry for device-level storage attachment requires system designers to develop multiple solutions for a full range of storage price/performance options. With the advent of Serial Attached SCSI, designers can use a common infrastructure to attach Serial Attached SCSI disks for performance-oriented, enterprise-class applications, or Serial ATA (SATA) disks for cost-optimized applications, or both.

Read article...

Cables

Serial Attached SCSI Cables and Connectors

Serial Attached SCSI Cables and Connectors

In the process of defining and standardizing the Serial Attached SCSI technology, the T10 technical and SFF committees have defined cables and connectors to support the many different SAS-based system topologies that can now be developed. These cables and connectors are available today from many suppliers. Additional connectors are also in development that will provide higher I/O density. This white paper summarizes these solutions and provides direction for the connectivity implementation of SAS-based systems. (February 2005)

Case Studies

Making the Move from FC to SAS

If you're a regular reader of STA's Serial Storage Wire, you know that there's a transition taking place in the storage industry from FC-AL to Serial-Attached SCSI (SAS) storage architectures and disk drives... NetApp is well into this technology transition, where SAS-connected disk shelves now account for a majority of storage shipped with new NetApp® systems.

Download full article.

Serial Attached SCSI Establishes its Position in the Enterprise

With the advent of 6Gb/s SAS, the Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) architecture and technology is growing its presence within traditional and non-traditional enterprise environments. This white paper will explore the roots of SAS technology, why the SAS architecture is well suited to enterprise markets and how the evolution of SAS technology expands its role in data centers. After addressing the increasing capabilities of SAS and how enterprise environments are deploying SAS, new growth opportunities will be discussed based on how the SAS architecture is adapting to the growing needs of the enterprise. (October 2008)

School System Scores Perfect Grade With SAS Products From Seagate and Promise Technology

With over 45,000 students, the Shelby County, Tenn., school system gets a lot of email traffic--over 49,000 in one day. Seagate® Barracuda® ES.2 SAS drives running in Promise Technology RAID systems give them the speed, capacity and reliability they need to handle those messages. The highest-capacity (up to 1 TB) nearline SAS drive on the market, the enterprise-class Barracuda ES.2 SAS drive delivers up to 135 percent higher performance than its SATA counterpart, as well as up to a 38 percent improvement in IOPS/watt. With an MTBF of 1.2 million hours, the drive offers unrivaled reliability among all 7200-RPM drives. (January 2009)

LSI and AIC Minimize Total Cost of Storage Ownership with SAS/SATA Solutions for a Broad Range of Markets

For SATA or SAS Functionality, Design Right First Time™ with Scalable LSI HBAs and MegaRAID┬« SAS Adapters Coupled with Turnkey Chassis from Advanced Industrial Computer (AIC)
Multi-level Partnership
Advanced Industrial Computer (AIC) (http://www.aicipc.com) is one of the industry's leading designers and manufacturers of rack-mount Server and Data Storage enclosure solutions. With over 100 years of combined experience between the mechanical, electronic, and system-level engineering teams, AIC leads the industry in all categories. With a complete silicon-to-systems portfolio of storage solutions, LSI develops multi- level partnerships with companies such as AIC to assure differentiated solutions that are valued by the end customer.

iGLASS Selects Solid Access USSD 200 with LSI SAS HBA Solution to Achieve a Remarkably Fast Storage System

iGLASS Nnetworks (http://www.iglass.net) provides innovative, measurable, network monitoring and management solutions for companies of all sizes. By combining its knowledge of networks with its in-depth understanding of the underlying principles of network communications, iGLASS offers a variety of services customized to meet each client's individual needs. As a SaaS (Software as a Service) provider of innovative outsourced network-monitoring solutions, it provides accurate, proactive monitoring of 6.5 million devices and management services for clients in the U.S.

Connectors

Serial Attached SCSI Cables and Connectors

Serial Attached SCSI Cables and Connectors

In the process of defining and standardizing the Serial Attached SCSI technology, the T10 technical and SFF committees have defined cables and connectors to support the many different SAS-based system topologies that can now be developed. These cables and connectors are available today from many suppliers. Additional connectors are also in development that will provide higher I/O density. This white paper summarizes these solutions and provides direction for the connectivity implementation of SAS-based systems. (February 2005)

Logos

Serial Attached SCSI Logos — 3Gb/s

The Serial Attached SCSI logo was created by the SCSI Trade Association (STA) membership to facilitate the identification of the Serial Attached SCSI architecture in the market place.

STA has not established a trademark or product compliance program to be associated with the logo. STA assumes those using the logo will do so in a manner that accurately depicts conformance with the Serial Attached SCSI specifications promulgated by the T10 Committee. STA expects that the market will use the Serial Attached SCSI logo as it has made use of the term "SCSI" as well as the various graphical and iconic representations of that standard.

In this regard this style guide has been prepared to encourage a consistent use of the logo to build a voluntary brand identity for this new and important interface.

The base design is a two-color logo in a borderless rectangle as shown below. There is also an "icon" version of this logo. The logo and icon may only be reproduced in the established two-color version or in black and gray-scale. Please refer to SAS Style Guide for more information about usage of the SAS logo and icon.

The various options are all available in .eps, .tif and .jpg formats for both color and black and gray-scale versions. Each .zip file below contains each of the 3 formats for the version displayed:

Click Here to Download
1.4 MB zip file
MultiLink_SAS_logo_color.jpg
Click Here to Download
1.2 MB zip file
MultiLink_SAS_logo_BLK.jpg

Presentations

  • Welcome Introduction (Harry Mason, LSI & STA)
  • SAS Market Update (Mike Karp, EMA)
  • Delivering on the Promise of SAS (Todd Mottershead, HP)
  • SAS To The Rescue (Arlin Sorenson, Heartland Technology Solutions)
  • SAS: Improving Performance, Lowering Cost (Bob Griswold, Microsoft)
  • SAS Powers Ahead! (Marty Czekalski, Seagate & STA)

SAS_OH_2008_v8 1.pdf

  • Welcome & Introduction to SAS (Marty Czekalski, Maxtor)
  • Impact of SAS on Storage (Phil Brace, LSI Logic)
  • Transitioning the Market to SAS (Bob Moore, HP)
  • Database Server Bricks: Case Study (Rich Johnson, Microsoft)
  • Demo Preview & Questions (Harry Mason, LSI Logic)

SAS_OH_presentation_060509 1.pdf

SAS in the Enterprise Data Center

March 2005 IDF Storage Community Presentation, by Marty Czekalski

  • SAS Products Entering the Market
  • SAS Advantages
  • SAS System Features
  • SAS Protocol is the Key to System Communication
  • Typical SAS High Availability System

Mar05StorageCommunity 1.pdf

SAS 1Q04 Industry Briefing

Steve Denegri, RBC — Predicts

"Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) is poised for adoption as a data transport in addition to its usage as a disk interface. In fact, with direct-attach storage (DAS) remaining a popular choice for incremental disk capacity needs, a tremendous opportunity exists for SAS in connecting these storage resources to servers. Just as SAS will likely displace Parallel SCSI as the interface of choice for enterprise disk drives, a similar upgrade to SAS may also take place at the host-attach level."

Jan04IndustryUpdate 1.pdf

SAS Overview

Overview of SAS architecture and position in the market; by: Marty Czekalski, Technical Marketing Manager, Maxtor — Member of the Board and Vice President of SCSI Trade Association.

  • Serial Attached SCSI is the next evolution of SCSI beyond U320
  • SAS has been designed to be a device and near cabinet interface only, not a network interface
  • Leverages an enhanced Serial ATA PHY while adding support for a second port
  • Serial SCSI utilizes features of Fibre Channel AND compatibility with SATA drives in a point-to-point, switched architecture

Martys_Final_SAS.pdf

What is Serial Technology?

Data travels in time and space between system components--the server and PC, the PC and connected devices, and within the software. Data that is transferred serially moves one bit at a time in linear succession through a fast single path. In contrast, data transferred in parallel mode consists of many data bits moving together simultaneously on a shared pathway.

The primary differentiator between serial and parallel architectures is the clock. In serial technology the clock is embedded in the data. This results in data constantly moving through the system from one point to another using the bandwidth to the fullest extent. A parallel architecture clock moves data at a measured pace, resulting in intermittent periods of inactivity. Data using parallel paths is akin to a vast army marching under the command of one general--it simply can't move as fast. The benefits of serial technology are well understood and are now being used for the most advanced desktop and enterprise applications including USB, 1394, Ethernet and Fibre Channel.

SAS_Brochure2003 1.pdf

Serial Attached SCSI Architecture

  • Key Serial Attached SCSI Features
  • Serial Attached SCSI Topology
  • Multiple Pathways Allow Concurrent Operation
  • Maximum Expander Device Topology
  • Two Edge Expanders
  • Typical Serial Attached SCSI Configuration
  • Out of Band Signaling (OOB)
  • Serial Attached SCSI Expander Operation (with SAS drives)
  • Serial Attached SCSI Expander Operation (with SATA drives)
  • Serial ATA Command Queuing and Serial Attached SCSI
  • Enabling Future Compatibility

SAS_Architecture_Overview.pdf

Roadmap

SAS Device to Mid-Plane Interconnects Roadmap

The MultiLink SASTM initiative's purpose is to improve how slot-oriented Solid State Drive (SSD) devices can be configured to improve I/O performance. The externally-accessible backplane slot-based drive architecture will be fully compatible for use with existing SAS/SATA storage devices as well as new devices designed to achieve higher performance.

A new form-factor compatible connector will extend SAS to a 4-port configuration. When running at 12Gb/s, a single slot will be capable of providing up to 96Gb/s of bandwidth (full duplex). Additional signals will be provided for general purpose use within the same connector. The MultiLink SASTM architecture is a slot-compatible implementation and will accommodate a variety of SSD form factors as well as existing hard disk drives (HDDs).

Minimizing the impact to protocol changes makes MultiLink SASTM primarily an enhancement to the existing connector. It was decided to maintain the existing Small Form Factor (SFF) slot dimensions for ease of refitting an existing system and for providing maximum system flexibility for storage OEMs.

SAS Device to Mid-Plane Interconnect Roadmap - August 2015.jpg

Notes:

  • This roadmap shows connectors that enable SAS devices to plug directly into mid-plane connectors (no cable)
  • The connectors are grouped by standard dual-port SAS, 4-port SAS (MultiLink SASTM), and Multifunction (i.e, support for multiple interfaces, including 4-port SAS)
  • The port configurations (1 port, 2 ports, 4 ports) available for each connector are described, along with the maximum speed for each configuration

View / download the PDF version of this roadmap: SAS Device to Mid-Plane Interconnects Roadmap - August 2015, with notes (1.3MB)

View / download the PDF version of all current STA roadmaps: STA Roadmaps - August 2015, with notes (1.5MB)

SAS Cabling Solutions Roadmaps

Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) burst upon the storage scene in 2004 as a serial replacement for the once ubiquitous parallel SCSI interconnect. While much attention is often given to the capabilities of the protocol and to the silicon and software required to implement these systems, it is often the physical interconnections that influence the adoption of I/O in a variety of market segments. Parallel SCSI, for example, supported everything necessary for clustered server deployments; however, the large unwieldy nature of the parallel cables and the restricted cabling distances greatly limited SCSI's applicability in these markets.

SAS removed many of these restrictions by opening up the bandwidth, improving cabling distances, and providing a compact connection scheme suitable for today's shrinking data center. While first generation solutions made tremendous strides forward, the connection schemes have continued to improve, opening up new markets for SAS in the process.

External Cabling Solutions

SAS External Cabling Solutions Roadmap - August 2015.jpg

Notes:

  • This roadmap shows the external cable connectors for each generation of SAS, grouped by max cable length & type
  • "Active" copper cables contain circuitry that enhances signal quality, thus extending the length at which the cable will reliably operate
    • Cables not containing such circuitry are "passive"
  • SAS Connectivity Management refers to cables that support the Cable Management Interface (CMI)
    • CMI enables a host to determine the type and characteristics of an attached cable by communicating with logic within the cable assembly
      • Cables supporting CMI are "managed"
      • Cables not supporting CMI are "unmanaged"
      • See SFF-8636 document for details (www.sffcommittee.com)

Internal Cabling Solutions

SAS Internal Cabling Solutions Roadmap - August 2015.jpg

Notes:

  • This roadmap shows the connectors for inside-the-box cabled connections
  • SFF-9401 specification provides pinouts from earlier mini-SAS and mini-SAS HD connectors to the new 24Gb/s SAS connectors

View / download the PDF version of these roadmaps: SAS Cabling Solutions Roadmaps - August 2015, with notes (1.4MB)

View / download the PDF version of all current STA roadmaps: STA Roadmaps - August 2015, with notes (1.5MB)

Serial Attached SCSI Technology Roadmap

SAS Technology Roadmap - August 2015.jpg

Notes:

  • This roadmap shows the availability of prototypes and end-user products for each generation of SAS
  • Schedule for 24Gb/s SAS is based on an understanding of the status of the SAS-4 standard and a general knowledge of industry product development
  • Plugfest is an event where industry participants test their prototype products to confirm interoperability
    • First 24Gb/s SAS Plugfest is expected to occur about mid-2017
  • End-user products typically become available approximately 12-18 months after the first Plugfest
    • 24Gb/s SAS end-user products are anticipated mid-2018 to early 2019

View / download the PDF version of this roadmap: SAS Technology Roadmap - August 2015, with notes (173KB)

View / download the PDF version of all current STA roadmaps: STA Roadmaps - August 2015, with notes (1.5MB)

Tutorials

SAS General Overview

SAS General Overview - 1.3MB

General marketing background, followed by the key topics from each layer.

SAS Architecture

SAS Architecture - 348KB

Covers the SAS object model, physical links and phys, ports, SAS devices, expander devices, domains, edge expander device sets, pathways, connections, SAS address, reset sequences, state machines, transmit data path, and describes the expander device model.

SAS Physical Layer

SAS Physical Layer - 256KB

Describes the lowest layer of SAS, covering passive interconnects (cables and connectors) and electrical characteristics.

SAS Phy Layer

SAS Phy Layer - 256KB

Describes 8b10b coding, OOB signaling, and speed negotiation.

SAS Link Layer - Part 1

SAS Link Layer - Part 1 - 364 BK

Covers primitives, clock skew management, CRC, scrambling, bit order, address frames, identification and hard reset sequences, and connections.

SAS Link Layer - Part 2

SAS Link Layer Part 2 - 344 BK

Covers arbitration fairness, deadlocks and livelocks, rate matching, SSP (Serial SCSI Protocol) frame transmission, STP (Serial ATA Tunneling Protocol) and Serial ATA frame transmission, and SMP (Serial Management Protocol) frame transmission.

SAS SCSI Upper Layers

SAS SCSI Upper Layers - 308 BK

Covers SCSI standards organization, basic SCSI architecture, important SCSI commands and status codes, important task management functions, SCSI transport protocol services, the SSP (Serial SCSI Protocol) transport layer, SAS-specific mode pages, SAS-specific log pages, and power conditions/spinup controls.

SAS ATA Upper Layers

SAS ATA Upper Layers- 228 BK

Covers basic ATA architecture, the ATA task file, ATA commands, Serial ATA frames, and compares ATAPI (ATA Packet Interface) vs. native SCSI.

SAS Management Upper Layers and Port Layer

SAS Management Upper Layers and Port Layer - 208KB

Covers the SMP transport layer and all the SMP functions, and concludes with a look at the port layer (which ties the transport layers to the link layers).

SAS Comparison to Fibre Channel FCP

SAS_FCP_comparison_public.pdf - 116KB

Covers the SMP transport layer and all the SMP functions, and concludes with a look at the port layer (which ties the transport layers to the link layers).

SAS Quiz Questions & Answers

SAS Quiz Questions - 76KB
SAS Quiz Answers - 86KB

A few fill-in-the-blank slides that review some key concepts.

White Papers

Serial Attached SCSI

Serial Attached SCSI

The industry is gearing up for Serial Attached SCSI (SAS), a new, faster version of SCSI designed to meet the demands of enterprise IT for the coming decade. The SAS interface supports both SAS disk drives for mission critical applications and Serial ATA (SATA) drives for low-cost bulk storage of reference data, giving IT managers greater price and performance flexibility in their storage strategies. As a result, managers can now make storage decisions that better align with business requirements, balancing their storage investment between compatible technologies and assigning storage devices to data based on the information's business value, providing a more cost-effective solution. (By Enterprise Management Associates, November 2004)

Serial Attached SCSI Cables and Connectors

Serial Attached SCSI Cables and Connectors

In the process of defining and standardizing the Serial Attached SCSI technology, the T10 technical and SFF committees have defined cables and connectors to support the many different SAS-based system topologies that can now be developed. These cables and connectors are available today from many suppliers. Additional connectors are also in development that will provide higher I/O density. This white paper summarizes these solutions and provides direction for the connectivity implementation of SAS-based systems. (February 2005)

SAS Raid-On-A-Motherboard: Affordable, high performance RAID

Full-featured RAID data protection is becoming a standard feature in businesses of almost any size, thanks to the increasing affordability of implementing RAID technology. Cost-effective RAID-on-motherboard (ROMB) solutions, using integrated RAID-on-Chip (RoC) devices, enable system integrators to implement robust hardware RAID solutions while optimizing their server motherboard investments. With the union of high-security, cost-effective ROMB and the built-in reliability and availability features included with SAS, system IT managers can now meet the data security requirements of tomorrow on the restrictive budgets of today. (April 2005)

Managing Access Control Through SAS Zoning

Managing Access Control Through SAS Zoning

Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) is gaining popularity in small storage area network (SAN) server environments. With its rise in popularity comes the need to segregate and manage device traffic in a similar fashion to what is already done in larger Fibre Channel networks by using zones or in Ethernet using virtual LANs. By doing this, IT administrators can create much more flexible, scalable, and efficient server networks that meet their business needs. SAS zoning, a proposal to the T10 Technical Committee for inclusion in the SAS-2 specification, provides this capability. (September 2005)

SOptimizing Storage with SAS: Seize the 15K Advantage

Enterprise storage is entering a new era of cost-effectiveness and efficiency, driven by the growing movement towards specialized storage solutions. The value proposition of this application-focused storage is straightforward: Optimize price/performance by matching the storage device to the specific characteristics (quantity, needed availability, etc.) of the data. Naturally, such an approach requires multiple device types, each cost-effectively performing its respective storage duties. (April 2006)

SAS Steps In

SAS Steps In

Over the past several years, companies have enjoyed a wide selection of technologies within the enterprise disk array market. Serial ATA (SATA), Fibre Channel (FC), and even parallel SCSI are viable options. More recently, Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) has entered the mainstream enterprise-class storage market, and its share is growing rapidly. Gartner Dataquest expects SAS to grow from its current 8 percent market share in multi-user drive shipments to 16 percent in 2007. By 2009, analysts expect SAS to make up 45 percent of that market. (March 2007)

SAS Starter Kit: Mixing SAS and SATA Drives in a Single Enclosure

Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) has begun to play a key role as the enterprise continues to move towards more optimized, cost-effective storage platforms. Overcoming many of the limitations of traditional parallel SCSI implementations, SAS solutions that offer connectivity choices and support both SAS and Serial ATA (SATA) drive technology enable enterprises to easily create tiered storage environments. However, concerns about performance expectations and Rotational Vibration Interference (RVI) in mixed SAS/SATA environments are preventing many organizations from adopting SAS technology. (March 2007)

Optimizie Your Investment with Serial Attached SCSI (SAS)

Since the emergence of Serial Attached SCSI two years ago, many high-end storage solution providers and OEMs have recognized the advantages of SAS over its parallel predecessor. Vertical markets that have since adopted SAS technology are the entertainment industry, medical imaging, financial institutions and research and government institutions, which typically need performance and/or capacity. SAS can offer good value, performance, and scalability. (October 2007)

Zoning

Managing Access Control Through SAS Zoning

Managing Access Control Through SAS Zoning

Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) is gaining popularity in small storage area network (SAN) server environments. With its rise in popularity comes the need to segregate and manage device traffic in a similar fashion to what is already done in larger Fibre Channel networks by using zones or in Ethernet using virtual LANs. By doing this, IT administrators can create much more flexible, scalable, and efficient server networks that meet their business needs. SAS zoning, a proposal to the T10 Technical Committee for inclusion in the SAS-2 specification, provides this capability. (September 2005)